Forrest Burki: Memoirs of a Jedi

Comments by Snowboard Magazine/

Jordan: Last winter we were a few states away from home staying in a hotel and your bank account was about relative to the outside temperature. What was it like living the gypsy life and is there anyone you want to thank or apologize to for helping you along the way?

Forrest: Well when it comes down to it we are all a team out there and we all have to look after each other. Working together should be mutually beneficial and when everyone is working at the same level it all comes full circle. You don't always have your own room and can feel like your intruding on wherever it is your staying, but in the end I think people understand how it is.

On the other hand it's nice to be able to go where you want, when you want. Kind of how you gotta do things some times if you're really going to go for it. I definitely want to thank Baker local Nick Ennen for going out of his way to help me out.

Jordan: Forrest, you said to me on more then one occasion, "Jordan, sometimes these things take effort." Can you tell us what you meant by that?

Forrest: Sometimes things work out perfectly, other times you gotta push past when your tired. I know we had a few late nights last year working on photos and at times had to push each other to keep at it. After that I think it became a joke when either of us were being lazy. There are times when everything lines up and you might be really tired, but when all the elements are there, you gotta push through to get the results your looking for.

Jordan: Whats your mindset when your out working with media? And is it necessary to find a balance between "work" days and pow days when you dedicate yourself to snowboarding?

Forrest: Im pretty happy to just be out there in general. I think shooting video and photos is fun and it adds an extra element beyond everyday riding to have that opportunity to capture some pretty amazing moments.

When I first started shooting with different people I was very eager to do what ever came up, but you don't want to be that guy whos always like "get this get that, over here, hey shoot this." I feel like my approach now is to sit back and wait for the right features that are really going be worth my effort, conserve energy, and have a little bit more tact with how I go about it.

When you're out with a crew it's important to work together and keep that balance. And of course putting the camera away and taking pow runs is always important.

Jordan: You get around more than Jenna Jameson, photographers and filmers can't seem to get enough. Was it beneficial to work with so many individuals rather then sticking with one crew?

Forrest: I just tried to take advantage of every opportunity that came up, and a lot of times it was just random. It was beneficial to so see how other crews work and integrate myself into each situation. Every group has their own style of how they go about things.

Jordan: You spend a lot of pow days shredding around Mt Baker, is that your home mountain?

Forrest: I grew up shredding at Crystal so I'd have to say that's my home mountain. Crystal is where I learned to ride but there wasn't a whole lot of people to learn from as far as pushing it on a snowboard goes. I would see random guys ripping around here and there. One day me and my buddies saw this dude doing big floaty backside 180 tailgrabs over this roller and we all thought it was the sickest thing we had ever scene. So just that kind of stuff. It wasn't until getting up to Baker that I saw people charging lines that made me start pushing myself to be at that level.

Jordan: Who is your favorite Star Wars character?

Forrest: Im not a big star wars guy but I'd have to say Yoda, he he seems pretty wise.

May the Forrest be with you…

Interview and photos by www.jordaningmire.com inn association with www.wildcardmovies.com